Save those sweet potato skins

According to Matthew Ballenden, founder of the Fresh Earth food store in Greenside, Johannesburg, the skins of sweet potatoes contain a number of additional nutrients.

These nutrients include a good dose of fibre – a serving of sweet potato baked in the skin provides more fibre than a serving of oatmeal, with a medium baked sweet potato with the skin delivering 5g of fibre and four times the recommended daily dose of beta carotene, at 26,082 IU per serving.

Beta carotene is also an antioxidant that is converted into vitamin A in the body. Sweet potatoes eaten with the skin also contain vitamin C, vitamin E and folate, as well as potassium and iron.

“It is therefore highly beneficial to eat your sweet potato with the skin. Scrub them well first to remove any dirt, then cook according to preference,” he suggests.

Ballenden, who prepares and sells organic, sustainable and nutritious vegetarian, vegan, raw, gluten-free, Banting and diabetic-friendly food at the Fresh Earth restaurant and deli, adds that you can also bake your sweet potato skins with olive oil and, once soft, smother them in guacamole.

Try this

“At home, we often brush our sweet potatoes clean, halve and score, brush liberally with olive oil and bake for 30–40 minutes at 180°C. We then top the halves with our very own basil pesto or homemade hummus”, said Ballenden. “It’s both a delicious and nutritious meal.”

Author: Tanja Schmitz

Co-Publisher at Maverick Media and until recently, Fitness Magazine editor. Tanja now manages multiple digital platforms, consults and create exciting campaigns and opportunities in the fitness industry. You’ll find her behind her computer or on her bike, dreaming up new ways to improve or create content for you.

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